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Biomass Technology

Aimplas launches biowaste to bioproducts project.

“The project will also advise city managers on how to adopt new organisational models that support the use of urban biowaste, as well as evidence-based EU-level policy recommendations for decision makers.”

A new project that aim to convert urban biowaste into resources such as food additives, condiments, biosolvents and bioplastics has been launched by Spanish plastics technology centre Aimplas.

The 3.5-year project called Ways TUP! will aim to improve perceptions of urban biowaste as a local resource and promote consumer participation in separate collection of urban biowaste for recovery.

Aimplas’s role in the project will be to produce packaging from polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) sourced from coffee and oil waste. PHA will first be formulated so it can be extruded, the sheet will be manufactured and the packaging will then be thermoformed.

In a statement, Aimplas said: “New profitable manufacturing business models will be developed to prepare the resulting technological solutions and end products for market entry.

“The project will also advise city managers on how to adopt new organisational models that support the use of urban biowaste, as well as evidence-based EU-level policy recommendations for decision makers.”

The project will involve 26 research partners, local authorities, businesses and city networks.


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