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Chemicals Markets

BASF launches biodegradable chelating agent based on renewable resources.

“We developed the readily biodegradable chelating agent Trilon M in the first place because we realised early on how important it was to find a sustainable alternative to phosphate and phosphonate.”

Chemical giant BASF has launched a biodegradable chelating agent called Trilon M Max EcoBalanced.

Chelating agents are materials that are used to control undesirable reactions of metal ions. They are used in a variety of applications including modern dishwasher tabs. They help to prevent and dissolve scales and dirt on dishes.

According to the company, it is the first renewables-based Trilon M grade produced according to its biomass balance approach. This approach is where products are made from renewable resources such as bio-naphtha or biogas at the very beginning of production and exhibit the same performance as their counterparts made from fossil feedstock.

In a statement, BASF also said that the renewable feedstock is then allocated to Trilon M Max EcoBalanced, using a TÜV Nord-certified method.

“The demand for homecare and industrial and institutional cleaning solutions with sustainable and high-quality ingredients is rising all the time,” said Soeren Hildebrandt, Senior Vice President, Home Care, I&I and Industrial Formulators Europe at BASF (@BASF).

He added: “We developed the readily biodegradable chelating agent Trilon M in the first place because we realised early on how important it was to find a sustainable alternative to phosphate and phosphonate.”

He went on to say that BASF’s new product helped to support its customers “on their journey to more sustainability by suing renewable raw materials”, whilst giving its customers full transparency with the REDcert2 certification at the same time.

As well as being used in dishwasher tabs, chelating agents are used as process aids in the paper industry and as intermediates in the production of specialised fertilisers.

BASF is not the only chemical company producing green chemicals. Many other chemical companies are starting to provide alternatives to traditional chemicals to help reduce their environmental footprints and provide bio-based materials to their customers.

Earlier this year, Christian Stammerjohann, head of department at German chemical group HELM, told Bio Market Insights: “Drop-in replacements of conventional chemicals will become more and more relevant as production technology and capacity scale is increasing rapidly.

“We do not see all basic chemicals to replaced by bio alternative but in the case of ethyl acetate there is proof already.”


Bio Market Insights Issue #14If you were interested in this biochemical story, you may also be interested in the ones below.

Read: 5 Minutes With… Christian Krueger from BASF.

Read: At the HELM of the bio-based chemical ship.

Read: Chinese chemical firm invests €5.5m in Danish biotech start-up to develop new biochemicals.

Read: Leaders interview: Frederik Feddes, Vice President, Biochemicals, Corbion.

Read: Could a PhD student have the breakthrough technology to reduce the price of biochemicals?

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