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Lenzing uses blockchain technology to help customers track its bio-based fibres from wood to clothes.

Stefan Doboczky, Chief Executive Officer of the Lenzing Group

“Together with TextileGenesis, we aim to create an unmatched level of transparency for brands and consumers. With this step Lenzing will further help to green up the textile industry.”

Austria-headquartered Lenzing has announced that it will use blockchain technology to establish and spread sustainability best practice across its bio-based fibre supply chain.

It’s bio-based fibre is called Tencel and is made from cellulose from wood. In a statement, Lenzing said that it will use blockchain technology to ensure that brands and consumers can track its Tencel products to verify that it comes from sustainable sources.

Lenzing (@LenzingAG) said it has decided to join the platform of the Hong Kong-based technology company TextileGenesis to accomplish its ambition.

Consumers increasingly want to understand the ingredients and suppliers of the products they buy, requesting a new level of transparency and traceability, according to Lenzing.

The supply chain transparency from wood to garment and home textiles will enable all customers and partners to identify Tencel fibres and the respective wood source in each production and distribution step. Thanks to a QR code on the final garment, consumers will be able to detect the origin of the clothes they intend to buy.

“With Lenzing Ecovero-branded fibres Lenzing was the frontrunner in physical traceability and is now entering the age of digital traceability. This milestone in transparency is a further strong commitment to sustainability,” said Stefan Doboczky, CEO at the Lenzing Group. “Together with TextileGenesis, we aim to create an unmatched level of transparency for brands and consumers. With this step Lenzing will further help to green up the textile industry.”

Lenzing will carry out several pilot tests over the next few months involving partners along the entire value chain. Lenzing expects the platform to be fully operational as of 2020.

Clothing brands such as H&M (@hm) and M&S (@marksandspencer) use Tencel fibres in their products.


If you were interested in this textile-based story, you may also be interested in these stories below.

Read: 5 Minutes With… Mattias Bodin from H&M

Read: 5 Minutes With… Jonah Mwangi from Green Nettle Textile.

Read: 5 Minutes With…Georgia Parker from Fashion for Good.

Take part:  Bio Market Insights reader survey 2019.

Read: 5 Minutes With… B.F., Founder and CEO Combat Wipes.

Download report: Introducing bio-based and sustainable components to long-standing supply chains.

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