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Lidl unveils ‘ocean bound’ plastic packaging for its seafood lines.

“We are proud to be the first UK supermarket introducing packaging incorporating plastic that would have otherwise ended up in the ocean, helping to tackle the problem directly as part of our commitment to prevent plastics ending up as waste.”

Supermarket chain Lidl is launching a range of recycled packaging made from ‘ocean bound’ plastic collected from beaches in South East Asia.

The UK initiative will see plastic likely to end up in the ocean gathered before it reaches the water and then recycled into a resin that can be turned into packaging.

In a statement, Lidl (@LidlGB) said that 13 of its fish products will use the packaging, including white fish and salmon. However, it will roll out the initiative to all of its fresh fish products by the end of 2020.

It will reduce the amount of plastic going into the ocean by 60 tonnes per year – or about 2.5 million plastic water bottles, the discount retailer claims.

Lidl has also improved the recyclability of its packaging, which will divert more than 200 tonnes from landfill with a new recyclable tray.

This packaging will now be labelled with ‘Widely Recyclable’, in line with On Pack Recycling Label guidelines, meaning the majority of customers can recycle at kerbside.

This new packaging forms part of the discounter’s initiatives to ensure 50% of packaging is made from recycled materials by 2025, reduce plastic by 20% by 2022, and make 100% of own brand packaging widely recyclable, reusable or refillable by 2025.

Georgina Hall, Lidl GB’s Head of Corporate Social Responsibility, said: “By 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish, according to data from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. The majority of ocean plastic enters the sea from ten main entry points, eight of which are in Asia. Countries like those in South East Asia lack the waste management infrastructure to manage this problem, which is often overwhelmed by population growth or tourism.

“We are proud to be the first UK supermarket introducing packaging incorporating plastic that would have otherwise ended up in the ocean, helping to tackle the problem directly as part of our commitment to prevent plastics ending up as waste. We are actively looking to extend this innovative solution to other product lines to help reduce the amount of plastic ending up in our oceans and keep our environments healthy.”


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Read: European Green Deal: Bioplastics to play a crucial role in making the deal become reality.

Read: Researchers work to develop biodegradable fishing gear to help tackle marine pollution.

Read: Prada to unveil recycled nylon bag collection made from ocean plastics, fishing nets and textile fibre waste.

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