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Michelin-led project formed to create new SVHC-free bio-sourced adhesive resin.

“Michelin continues to demonstrate its commitment to the environment, including outside the tyre industry, by making its expertise in the field of sustainable materials available to industry as a whole.”

A Michelin-led project is aiming to create a new adhesive resin without any ‘substances of very high concern’ (SVHC)classified  compounds.

As well as tyre specialist Michelin, the project called BioImpulse brings together major public and private players, including technological institute FCBA, agricultural research institute INRA and engineering institute INSA, as well as Lesaffre through its Leaf (fermentation specialist) business unit. The BioImpulse project is supported by ADEME under France’s Future Investment Programme.

An SVHC is a chemical substance (or part of a group of chemical substances) for which it has been proposed that the use within the European Union be subject to authorisation under the REACH Regulation.

Industrial adhesive resins historically contain SVHC compounds. The global market for substitution represents significant potential, primarily in the automotive and construction markets.

In a statement, Michelin (@Michelin) said that one of the main objectives of the BioImpulse project was to create a new adhesive resin without any SVHC compound, “with an improved impact on both health and the environment”.

The project also aims to develop an industrial-scale fermentation production process of a molecule of interest at a lower cost than its oil-based equivalent.

The initiative is aimed at the automotive and construction markets, with a main focus on wood. The consortium aims to produce this resin in small, compact and decentralised plants, as close as possible to customers, “reducing its complexity and implementation costs”, Michelin said.

The six-year project will cost €28.1 million and aims to integrate what Michelin describes as a “significant section of the value chain”: from the biological production of the molecule to the performance of the resin in use.

Eco-design will be at the heart of the project in order to take the health, environmental and economic aspects into account. Michelin said.

Florent Menegaux said: “With this research project carried out in collaboration with our partners, Michelin continues to demonstrate its commitment to the environment, including outside the tyre industry, by making its expertise in the field of sustainable materials available to industry as a whole.”

The construction of the first industrial production plant is planned for 2026.


If you were interested in this bioeconomy story, you may also be interested in the below bioeconomy stories.

Read: Michelin’s Vision: airless, organic, rechargeable and connected

Read: Swedish firm Nynas launches bio-based tyre oil.

Read: Goodyear’s new Oxygene concept tyre aims to help drive the circular economy forward.

Download: New report: Bringing synthetic biology innovations to commercial scale.

Read: European Commission urges industry to do more to boost recycled plastics market

Read: European Commission launches ‘Circular Plastics Alliance’ to help create ‘well-functioning market’ for recycled plastics.

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