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Nike unveils footwear made from factory floor-sourced scrap material.

Nike’s new Space Hippie trainers are made from scrap materials from factory floors. ©Nike.

“The basis for the engineered knits that form the Space Hippie uppers is created using what we call ‘Space Waste Yarn.’ These yarns are made from 100% recycled material — including recycled plastic water bottles, T-shirts and yarn scraps.”

Sportswear giant Nike has launched a new range of footwear that makes use of scrap material sourced from its factory floors, and recycled material.

Its ‘Space Hippie’ exploratory footwear collection is due to be launched and is part of its ‘Move to Zero’ philosophy – Nike’s goal to move towards a zero-carbon future.

The sportswear brand’s Space Hippie shoes are made in-line with circular design principles are said to “attack the villain of trash”, according to Nike’s (@Nike) chief design officer, John Hoke.

“It’s changed the way we look at materials, it’s changed the way that we look at the aesthetics of our product. It’s changed how we approach putting product together,” he added.

“We believe the future for product will be circular,” said Seana Hannah, VP, Sustainable Innovation. “We must think about the entire process: how we design it, how we make it, how we use it, how we reuse it and how we cut out waste at every step. These are the fundamentals of a circular mindset that inform best practices.”

In a statement, Nike explained: “The basis for the engineered knits that form the Space Hippie uppers is created using what we call ‘Space Waste Yarn.’ These yarns are made from 100% recycled material — including recycled plastic water bottles, T-shirts and yarn scraps. Combined with the other elements of the Space Hippie 02, we get an upper that is 90% recycled content by weight.”

According to Nike, Space Hippie embodies the idea that designers have a right and responsibility in problem-solving. It also uses recycled content. Like a barrier-breaking run, the innovation should provide us all a healthy dose of inspiration.

Separately, the brand is also launching a sportswear collection made from recycled material.

A new, unlined Nike Sportswear Windrunner jacket features 100% recycled polyester plain weave fabrication. The drawcords and zippers made from Nike Grind — a palette of premium materials (rubber, foam, fiber, leather and textile blends) recovered in the footwear manufacturing and recycling process — accentuate the collection’s statement as a roadmap toward a zero carbon and zero waste future.

Nike is the latest in a long line of sportswear brands to launch apparel and footwear made from recycled materials. Puma has recently linked up with environmental organisation First Mile to launch clothes and footwear made from recycled plastic.

The co-branded collection has been designed to help consumers perform their best during any workout and features shoes and apparel, which have been made from recycled yarn that is manufactured from plastic bottles collected in the First Mile ‘people-focused’ network in Taiwan, Honduras and Haiti.

If you were interested in this bioeconomy story, you may also be interested in the ones below. 

Read:  Puma teams up with First Mile to launch sportswear collection made from recycled plastic

Read: Fashion heavyweights unveil sustainability initiatives to G7.

Read: PrimaLoft unveils biodegradable synthetic fabric made to break down in landfill.

Read: PrimaLoft claims polyester circular economy breakthrough.

Read: Adidas works with PrimaLoft to launch ocean plastic insulation.

Read: Adidas and NHL team up to unveil hockey jerseys made from Parley Ocean Plastic.

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