Image default
Markets Materials

Shiseido teams up with Kaneka to develop biodegradable cosmetic packaging.

Shiseido has been working toward a common goal of “collectively shaping the future of sustainable packaging” with global cosmetics companies since 2018.

“Shiseido aims to minimise environmental impact by developing containers that realise not only good usability and beautiful design, but also environmental friendliness through its unique technologies and collaborations inside and outside the company.”

Cosmetics firm Shiseido and Japan-based chemical company Kaneka Corporation have teamed up to develop bio-based packaging for Shiseido’s cosmetic products.

Kaneka will provide Japan-based Shiseido with its ‘Biodegradable Polymer’ – a proprietary material that is also biodegradable in seawater.

The initiative originates from a corporate mission started by Shiseido (@SHISEIDO_corp) this year called ‘beauty innovations for a better world’ in order to promote sustainability.

As part of its ongoing green initiatives, Shiseido aims to develop a biodegradable container with a positive impact on the environment by combining Kaneka’s proprietary polymer material development technology and Shiseido’s long years of expertise in developing containers for cosmetics.

As the first Japanese company to participate in SPICE (Sustainable Packaging Initiative for CosmEtics: an initiative for the development of sustainable packaging for cosmetics), Shiseido has been working toward a common goal of “collectively shaping the future of sustainable packaging” with global cosmetics companies since 2018.

In addition to this, Shiseido has been using sugarcane-derived polyethylene containers for its hair care products since 2011 and plastic resins mechanically recycled from collected plastic bottles for its body shampoo containers since 2015.

In a statement, Shiseido said: “Shiseido aims to minimise environmental impact by developing containers that realise not only good usability and beautiful design, but also environmental friendliness through its unique technologies and collaborations inside and outside the company.”

Shiseido is not the only cosmetic firm using bio-based materials for its products. Awareness of the problem of plastic pollution and the impact on the environment has led many other well-known brands down this path.

‘Natural material’

Bulldog Skincare for Men is a typical example. The brand is using green packaging made from sugarcane plastics.

For every 100 tonnes of sugarcane plastic used in Bulldog tubes, 309 tonnes of CO2 are taken out of the environment, the UK-based cosmetics firm said in a statement.

In a statement, the company added: “Instead, of using traditional plastic, Bulldog are making the same tubes with plastic derived from sugarcane – a natural material.”

According to Bulldog, sugarcane in Brazil is grown thousands of kilometres from the Amazon rainforest, on degraded pasture land which in turn helps to recover the soil for future use as general farmland or to simply plant another crop of sugarcane.

Aveda, another UK cosmetics firm, claims that more than 85% of its skin care and hair styling PET bottles and jars contain 100% post-consumer recycled materials.

“With every package we develop, we’re mindful of our environmental footprint and work to minimise our packaging and maximise our use of recyclable and post-consumer recycled materials,” Aveda said in a statement.

Elsewhere, cosmetics giant L’Oreal has set out a goal to ensure that 100% of the group’s packaging will be refillable, reusable or compostable by 2025.

In its recently released 2018 Sustainability Report, the L’Oreal said it replaced virgin materials with 8,705 tonnes of recycled materials (PCR) in 2018, an increase of 19% on 2017. The company explained: “This progress is primarily the result of its efforts to integrate recycled materials within the plastic component of its packaging, with a 38% increase compared to 2017.”

However, L’Oreal was recently criticised on its sustainability credentials by I newspaper journalist Janet Street-Porter. On Saturday 4 May, she wrote: “We can’t trust businesses to tell us how to save the environment – a cosmetics company like L’Oreal (which puts face creams, shampoo and cosmetics in plastic containers) has the bare-faced cheek to sponsor a new educational initiative to teach school children about recycling – a blatant example of greenwashing.”

Bio Market Insights contacted L’Oreal this morning but nobody was available for comment.


Are you interested in reading more about biodegradable packaging? If yes, please read the stories below…

Read: UK compostable packaging market poised for tenfold increase by 2025, new report finds.

Read: UK chemistry graduate unveils biodegradable water bottle.

Read: Nestlé reiterates plan to promote biodegradable packaging solutions in a bid to tackle plastic waste.

NEW!: And available to download issue #14 of the Bio Market Insights Quarterly

Visit: SynBio Markets (Berlin, 18-19 November 2019) 

Related posts

M&S deflate air in packaging to slash plastic and carbon waste.

Emily Odowd

How a unique set of building blocks have created a vibrant and growing bio-economy in Canada.

Luke Upton

Covestro works with partners to develop CO2-based elastic textile fibres.

Liz Gyekye

Leave a Comment

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More