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Sustainability takes the prize: London Marathon organisers to produce bottle belts made from recycled materials.

“We believe we run the best mass participation events in the world and we want to match that by leading the world in mass participation event sustainability.”

Runners will be taking to the streets of London for the 39th marathon on 28th April. It is not often that sustainability crosses their minds. They normally have other things to worry about, like ‘have I trained enough?  Can I get around the 26.2 miles in one piece? and what should I eat before the big day?’ However, this year the organiser of the London Marathon, called London Marathon Events (LME), has announced that sustainability will be a top priority.

London Marathon 2019 will see 700 runners trial new bottle belts made from 90% recycled materials. LME has worked with bag manufacturer Manhattan Portage to create the belts which are specially designed to carry the Buxton 250ml bottle. This initiative will also monitor how much water a runner uses. Encouraging runners to carry their own water has the potential to radically change how hydration is provided at mass participation running events. The bottle belts will be collected for cleaning and reuse.

LME (@LondonMarathon) has also committed to ensuring zero waste landfill by December 2020 through improved procurement, maximising reuse and recycling.

All Lucozade Sport bottles used will be made from 100% recycled plastic – a first for the brand and all Buxton water bottles will be made from 50% recycled plastic – a UK first.

Lucozade Sport (@LucozadeSport) will also be providing Oohos (seaweed edible and biodegradable capsules) at the event at Mile 23. Bio Market Insights first reported on the capsule last year. Essentially, Oohos are made entirely of seaweed extract and can naturally biodegrade in four to six weeks just as quickly as a piece of fruit.

Oohos are made entirely from seaweed extract, are edible and compostable, and they naturally biodegrade in four to six weeks just as quickly as a piece of fruit.

“We are passionate about the concept of ‘Eliminate, Reduce, Reuse and Recycle’ and fully committed to reducing our environmental impact. We believe we run the best mass participation events in the world and we want to match that by leading the world in mass participation event sustainability.”

A unique closed-loop recycling project for plastic bottles in Tower Hamlets, Greenwich, Southwark and Canary Wharf. Bottles used int these boroughs will be collected and returned directly to a bottle reprocessing plant, where they will be recycled into new bottles. Bottles used in other boroughs will still be recycled but not through a closed-loop system.

UK-based bank Virgin Money (@VirginMoney) will be sponsoring the London Marathon. Emma Tottenham, Chief of Staff at CYBG, owner of Virgin Money, said: “We have a target of achieving zero carbon and zero waste by 2030. None of our waste has gone to landfill since 2016, and last year we recycled 74% of our waste, but we are continually looking to improve.

“As we build the strategy for the new enlarged bank, our community, social and environmental focus is front and centre. We are proud to work with the London Marathon and support its efforts to reduce the environmental impacts of the event.”

(Main top image_Copyright_London Marathon Events).


You may also be interested in reading…

Read: Seaweed and Lucozade team-up to tackle plastic waste at mass participation events.

Read: Evian and Suntory continue their commitment to sustainability, developing 100% recycled bottles.

Read: Suntory and Anellotech to continue developing 100% bio-based bottles.

NEW!: And available to download issue #13 of the Bio Market Insights Quarterly

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