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Zara unveils 2025 sustainable fabric pledge.

Zara has announced that 100% of the cotton, linen and polyester used in its clothing will be organic, sustainable or recycled by 2025. ©Zara.

“Sustainability is a never-ending task in which everyone here at Inditex is involved and in which we are successfully engaging all of our suppliers.”

Spanish fashion giant Zara has announced that 100% of the cotton, linen and polyester used in its clothing will be organic, sustainable or recycled by 2025.

Zara’s holding group, Inditex, made the sustainability pledge at its annual shareholders’ meeting last week (16 July).

The company stated that it will only use linen, polyester and cotton that is “organic, more sustainable or recycled”, as one of a number of sustainable targets for the next six years.

Polyester, linen and cotton make up 90% of all raw materials purchased by the brand. Inditex (@InditexSpain) stated that it wanted to make these materials more sustainable by 2023.

In addition, Inditex maintained that 80% of the energy used in the group activities (stores, logistic centres and offices) will be renewable.

The target will apply to all eight of Inditex’s brands, including Zara(@ZARA,) Zara Home (@zarahome), Massimo Dutti (@massimodutti), Pull&Bear (@pullandbear,) Bershka (@Bershka), Uterque (@UterqueOfficial), Oysho (@Oysho) and Stradivarius (@stradivarius).

“Sustainability is a never-ending task in which everyone here at Inditex is involved and in which we are successfully engaging all of our suppliers,” said Inditex chairman and CEO Pablo Isla.

“Our digital transformation and determined progress towards the most demanding sustainability standards are complementary and underpinned by the efficiency of our long-standing business model, which is based on offering our customers the best in quality fashion.

Elsewhere, Inditex is aiming to fully eliminate single-use plastics from customer sales, and will be sending 100% of the waste generated at its head offices and stores for recycling or reuse.

Next year, all of the group’s stores will have been fitted with containers for collecting used clothing for subsequent charitable purpose reuse or recycling. The scheme called ‘Clothing Collection’ programme is one of the cornerstones of Inditex’s circular economy effort, according to the group.

Since its launch in 2015, more than 34,000 tonnes of garments, footwear and accessories have been collected through dedicated containers placed in the company’s stores, offices and logistics platforms.

Isla said that the group’s “sustainability transformation is only possible thanks to the sold business model performance, which is generating the funds needed to reinvest in the company’s future”.

According to Inditex, its shareholders also approved the creation of a new “Sustainability Committee within the Board of Directors”.


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